Blue Ridge Christian Academy is in the middle of a controversy that shouldn’t even exist

So there’s been a little controversy lately about a certain fourth grade science test at a private, Christian school that happens to be about 20 minutes from my house. It looks like so.

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The backlash on the school, Blue Ridge Christian Academy, has been pretty harsh, particularly from atheists. This school also happens to be where my little cousin is educated, so I may or may not be somewhat biased.

And, as usual, I think I’ll blow up everyone involved.

Seriously, science is based on what one can measure and replicate within an experiment. It’s about what we can observe.

In fact, Creationism is not scientific, as we can’t observe it.

We have not observed that the universe is not, in fact, billions of years old.

We have not observed that the dinosaurs didn’t live millions of years ago.

We don’t know for sure that animals only ate plants.

On the other hand, Evolution is not scientific, as we’ve never observed it.

No one was around to see and record the universe when it was first created, except God.

We have no records of dinosaurs and people living together or not living together, largely because written records from that long ago are remarkably scarce.

As a Christian, I have serious problems with Evolution. Not only has macro-evolution, where one species turns into another, never been observed; it doesn’t even make genetic sense.

But I also have a problem with teaching this as science. It’s simply not science and a lot of it rests on seriously shaky theology. Saying animals with sharp teeth didn’t eat other animals? The only backing for that is that God made garments for Adam and Eve out of skin, and that’s the first mentioned death in the Bible. Does that mean nothing else died before, ever? What about bacteria or plant cells in stomach acid? That’s stuff dying.

Obviously, the Richard Dawkins of the world routinely take it upon themselves to act like they know everything. Let’s not stoop to their level by saying that this is the only way it could have possibly happened.

Instead, let’s look at what’s really important.

“For I delivered to you as of first importance what I also received: that Christ died for our sins in accordance with the Scriptures, that he was buried, that he was raised on the third day in accordance with the Scriptures, and that he appeared to Cephas, then to the twelve. Then he appeared to more than five hundred brothers at one time, most of whom are still alive, though some have fallen asleep. Then he appeared to James, then to all the apostles. Last of all, as to one untimely born, he appeared also to me. For I am the least of the apostles, unworthy to be called an apostle, because I persecuted the church of God. But by the grace of God I am what I am, and his grace toward me was not in vain. On the contrary, I worked harder than any of them, though it was not I, but the grace of God that is with me. Whether then it was I or they, so we preach and so you believed.”

1 Corinthians 15:3-11

What does Paul say is most important? Jesus and the grace he extends. That’s it. Everything else is secondary.

Mark Driscoll (and others, I’m sure. I just heard it from him) uses an analogy of the closed fist and open hand. We hold onto the core things in the closed fist and the secondary things in the open hand, because you don’t want to bludgeon people with things that aren’t essential.

We’ve allowed this to be a distraction for too long. If someone thinks God took his time or used a slightly different method to make things than you do, does that does that really undermine the Gospel? Does that really change the fact that we’re jacked up and need grace?

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